Tag: Humanities

Episode 72: A Building (Almost) Named Nate

This week, we sit down with the UConn School of Law’s John Aloysius Cogan Jr. to learn about this week’s arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court concerning the Affordable Care Act, and we travel back to the mid-1970s to discover an iconic campus building’s original name.

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Episode 71: Where Have All the Glide-O-Rides Gone?

This week, History Prof. Manisha Sinha talks about the significance of the 2020 presidential election within the context of U.S. history, as part of our ongoing Brave Space series; Political Science Prof. Evan Perkoski discusses his study of the role civil society can play in preventing (or worsening) mass violence; and we learn about bygone […]

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Episode 70: Finding the Blues

This week, we track down a documentary about American blues legends that had long been thought lost, and learn why Spring Break was once looked forward to as a time when students could finally take off their hats.

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Episode 67: Here Comes the Story of the Hurricane

This week, we talk with Professor Caitlin Lombardi about how low family income can adversely affect the development of children’s math skills, and we learn how the Hurricane of 1938 left an indelible mark on campus, but couldn’t stop the first day of classes.

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Episode 65: The Great Grade-Change Caper

This week, Prof. Rachael Gabriel, director of the Neag School of Education’s Reading and Language Arts Center, tells us about some of the initiatives she’s hoping will help students, teachers, and parents stay on top of reading education during the pandemic. Also, we travel back to the early 1960s to learn the details of a […]

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Episode 62: Dig This Episode, Literally! (Well, Not Literally)

In this episode, UConn Humanities Institute Fellow Siavash Samei ’19 PhD tells us about his work on archaeological digs in what used to be Mesopotamia, and what they tell us about industry in the Bronze Age; we learn about a UConn class so popular students deliberately flunked so they could take it again; and we […]

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Episode 61: A Nation in Turmoil

With marches and protests in small towns and big cities across the country in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, a black man, by Minneapolis police officers, we convened a panel of UConn faculty members affiliated with the Africana Studies Institute to help us understand the events unfolding across the nation and the […]

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Episode 59: The Graduate

This week, we bid a bittersweet farewell to ace student worker Maxine Philavong, who received her bachelor’s degree on May 9. We also talk with Humanities Institute Fellow Nu-Ahn Tran, an associate professor of history in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, who tells us about her work with archival material that sheds new light […]

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Episode 53: Radio Free UConn

This week, we meet the UConn Woodsmen, one of the most distinctive and interesting student clubs on campus; we learn from Prof. Christopher Vials why a new anthology about the history of anti-fascism is so timely; and we ponder the call letters for UConn’s very first radio station and consider the career of its founder, […]

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Episode 52: The Future of Our Brains

This week, UConn philosopher Susan Schneider tells us about some of the possible benefits (and some of the potentially terrifying downsides) to artificial intelligence; Daniel Burkey, associate dean in the School of Engineering, explains how the school became a nationally-lauded model of student diversity; and we learn about two incidents in 1960 that involved flags […]

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